THE FACEBOOK EFFECT EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. There's never been a Web site like Facebook: tiebuckverpani.ml: The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World eBook: David Kirkpatrick: site Store. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. There's never been a Web site like Facebook: tiebuckverpani.ml: The Facebook Effect: The Real Inside Story of Mark Zuckerberg and the World's Fastest Growing Company eBook: David Kirkpatrick: . "Today - six years after it was created in a Harvard dorm room - over million people use Facebook regularly, in just about every country on earth. That a.


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As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects—even becoming instrumental in political protests from Colombia to Iran. Today - six years after it was created in a Harvard dorm room - over million people use Facebook regularly, in just about every country on earth. That a. The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick - Free download as PDF File .pdf) or read online for free. The Inside Story of the ISBN (ebook).

Many see Facebook as merely a celebration of the minutiae of our lives. Such people view it as a platform for nar- cissism rather than a tool for communication. Could it lead to greater conformity? Are young people who spend their days on Facebook losing their ability to recognize and experience change and excitement in the real world? Does Facebook merely contribute to information over- load? Could we thus become less informed?

The average Facebook user has about Can you really have friends, as many do? For some, Facebook may generate a false sense of companionship and over time increase a feeling of aloneness. So far there is little data to show how widespread this problem may be, though as our use of electronic media continues in coming years it will certainly remain a widespread concern. As other tables emptied out, we moved on to coffee and the staff started mop- ping the floor.

Zuckerberg was, as always, wearing a T-shirt, but since it was a little chilly he had on another of his staples—a fleece jacket. His answer was all about transparency. Ap- propriately enough, Zuckerberg himself is almost compulsively candid. And you think about things in this abstract way.

Very idealistic. Very liberal at this institution. So a lot of these values are just around you: the world should be governed by people. A lot of that stuff has really shaped me.

The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick

And this is a lot of what Facebook is pushing for. But we had no idea we would play a part in it. We were just a group of college kids. Mark Zuckerberg was never one to defer to authority figures. But what he built turns individuals into the authority. The entire service revolves around the profile and the actions of people.

Facebook empowers them at the expense of institutions. Facebook is bringing the world together.

It has become an overarch- ing common cultural experience for people worldwide, especially young people. Despite its modest beginnings as the college project of a nineteen-year-old, it has become a technological powerhouse with unprecedented influence across modern life, both public and private.

Its membership spans generations, geographies, languages, and class. It may in fact be the fastest-growing company of any type in history. Facebook is even bigger in countries like Chile and Norway than it is in the United States. It changes how people communicate and in- teract, how marketers sell products, how governments reach out to citizens, even how companies operate. It is altering the character of political activism, and in some countries it is starting to affect the processes of democracy itself.

This is no longer just a plaything for college students.

It is the second-most-visited site, after Google, and claims more than million active users as of February Well over 20 percent of the 1. Facebook added high school students in fall and opened to everyone in fall And even despite all its growth, the num- ber of people there is growing at a mind-bending rate—about 5 percent a month. Were the growth rates of both Facebook and the Internet to remain steady, by every single person online worldwide would be on Facebook.

Of course that will never happen. But Facebook already operates in seventy-five languages, and about 75 percent of its active users are outside the United States. About million Americans are active on Facebook, or That sounds impressive. The largest number of Facebook users is still in the United States, but the next ten countries are a global mix. Unlike just about any other website or technology business, Face- book is profoundly, centrally, about people. It is a platform for people to get more out of their lives.

The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick

It is a new form of communication, just as was instant messaging, email, the telephone, and the telegraph. Dur- ing the early days of the World Wide Web, people sometimes said that everyone would eventually have their own home page. Facebook connects those pages to one another in ways that enable us to do entirely new things.

But this scale, rate of growth, and social penetration raise com- plicated social, political, regulatory, and policy questions. How will repressive gov- ernments respond to this new form of citizen empowerment? Should a service this large be regulated? How do we feel about an entirely new form of communication used by hundreds of millions of people that is completely controlled by one company?

Are we risking our freedom by entrusting so much information about our identity to one commercial entity? Tensions around these questions will grow if Facebook keeps extending its influence across more and more of the globe.

This book aims to explore these questions. But you can only un- derstand how Facebook became such an amazing company and where it might go if you understand how it all got started in a dormitory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as the brainchild of a restless and irreverent nineteen-year-old kid.

It was big and un- wieldy, like some of the ideas he would diagram there. There was only one wall of the four-person suite long enough to hold it—the one in the hallway on the way to the bedrooms.

Zuckerberg, a computer science major, began scribbling away. The wall became a tangle of formulas and symbols sprouting mul- ticolored lines that wove this way and that. Zuckerberg would stand in the hall staring at it all, marker in hand, squeezing against the wall if someone needed to get by.

Sometimes he would back into a bedroom doorway to get a better look. He spent endless hours writing software code, regardless of how much noncomputing classwork he might have.

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Sleep was never a priority. Right away that first week, Zuckerberg cobbled together Internet software he called Course Match, an innocent enough project. He did it just for fun. The idea was to help students pick classes based on who else was taking them. You could click on a course to see who was signed up, or click on a person to see the courses he or she was taking. The status-conscious students of Harvard felt very differently about a class depending on who was in it.

Zuckerberg had written a program they wanted to use. Mark Zuckerberg was a short, slender, intense introvert with curly brown hair whose fresh freckled face made him look closer to fifteen than the nineteen he was. His uniform was baggy jeans, rubber sandals—even in winter—and a T-shirt that usually had some sort of clever picture or phrase.

When he did speak, he was wry. His tendency was to say nothing until others fully had their say. He stared. He would stare at you while you were talking, and stay absolutely silent.

But if you went on too long or said something obvious, he would start looking through you. Zuckerberg is a highly deliberate thinker and rational to the extreme. His handwrit- ing is well ordered, meticulous, and tiny, and he sometimes uses it to fill notebooks with lengthy deliberations. Girls were drawn to his mischievous smile. He was seldom without a girlfriend. They liked his confidence, his humor, and his irreverence.

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It certainly had so far. Zuckerberg is the second-oldest of four children of a dentist father and a psychologist mother, and the only boy.

The family home, though the largest in the neighborhood, remains modest. Its dental office in the basement is dominated by a giant aquarium. His older sister Randi is now a senior marketer at Facebook.

The Facebook Effect

Each of the two bedrooms came with bunk beds and a small desk. Bekijk de voorwaarden.

Alle prijzen zijn inclusief BTW en andere heffingen en exclusief eventuele verzendkosten en servicekosten. David Kirkpatrick. E-mail deze pagina. Inkijkexemplaar Bekijk video. Ebooks lezen is heel makkelijk. Na aankoop zijn ze direct beschikbaar op je Kobo e-reader en op je smartphone of tablet met de gratis bol. Samenvatting In little more than half a decade, Facebook has gone from a dorm-room novelty to a company with million users.

It is one of the fastest growing companies in history, an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of millions of adults worldwide. As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects—even becoming instrumental in political protests from Colombia to Iran. Veteran technology reporter David Kirkpatrick had the full cooperation of Facebook's key executives in researching this fascinating history of the company and its impact on our lives.

Kirkpatrick tells us how Facebook was created, why it has flourished, and where it is going next. He chronicles its successes and missteps, and gives readers the most complete assessment anywhere of founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the central figure in the company's remarkable ascent. This is the Facebook story that can be found nowhere else. How did a nineteen-year-old Harvard student create a company that has transformed the Internet and how did he grow it to its current enormous size?

Kirkpatrick shows how Zuckerberg steadfastly refused to compromise his vision, insistently focusing on growth over profits and preaching that Facebook must dominate his word communication on the Internet. In the process, he and a small group of key executives have created a company that has changed social life in the United States and elsewhere, a company that has become a ubiquitous presence in marketing, altering politics, business, and even our sense of our own identity.

This is the Facebook Effect.

Toon meer Toon minder. Recensie s Fast-paced. One part is the exhaustively reported story of Facebook's founding and meteoric rise to near ubiquity; the other is a thoughtful analysis of its impact. The human drama of Mark Zuckerberg and his colleagues gives an exciting glimpse of how to launch a game-changing startup.

His Life and Universe Kirkpatrick tells a gripping tale of how the company was created and came to such dominance. This is the Facebook Effect. Facebook and the World.

Changing Our Institutions. The Evolution of Facebook. Additional Reading. The Facebook Effect. The Platform. Making Money. The Future.The book suffers at times from gushy editorializing, but overall the reporting is balanced with a few exceptions , and readers can weigh the facts on their own.

This book is one of those books one should not miss to read. June Get this book here: That one of them, the visionary Mark Zuckerberg, had the maturity, strategic smarts and luck to keep his company ahead of its rivals anchors the tale.

Long-run growth was always a stronger priority than short-term ad revenue. In the process, he and a small group of key executives have created a company that has changed social life in the United States and elsewhere, a company that has become a ubiquitous presence in marketing, altering politics, business, and even our sense of our own identity. Facebook added high school students in fall and opened to everyone in fall David Fitzpatrick gives convincing answers to these questions that have been hotly debated among users for years.

Of course that will never happen.